Parenting a Child with Down Syndrome

By Amanda Brunning, TLC Preschool Teacher & TLC Parent

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month. My son, Caleb, was diagnosed with Down syndrome when he was born, and our family has since been on a transformative journey as Caleb grows and explores his world, and as we learn how to be the best parents to him that we can be.

Caleb.jpg

I want to share what I have learned in the past two years about Down syndrome and how my son has changed me. When we got the call about Caleb two years ago (my husband and I were hoping to adopt a child), the first thing our caseworker told us was that he had Down syndrome. Working with children with a variety of special needs as a teacher, I knew a little bit about Down syndrome. I knew that this meant that he had been born with an extra 21st chromosome, and that he would most likely have a list of other health issues, some that would not become apparent until he continued to grow. I knew that bringing home our son meant many doctor trips and multiple therapy sessions each week including speech therapy, occupational therapy, and physical therapy. I knew that he would hit milestones at different times then a typically-developing child. I knew that his speech would be delayed and that I might not hear him say “Momma” or “Daddy” until long after other children had begun using words. I know that if we said yes to this child that we would be busy, but “yes” was the only option for us. To say that was the best “yes” decision we made in our lives would be an understatement, because Caleb has taught me so much about being a mom, being a mom to a child with special needs, and about being a better person.

After we brought Caleb home, I quickly started to learn that there was much that I didn’t know about Down syndrome and that what I did know about it barley scratched the surface. We knew we had a lot of work to do with a brand new infant with special needs, and so we jumped into our new life as it quickly filled up with doctors and therapy appointments. One of the most important early doctors appointments was a visit to the Sie Center for Children with Down Syndrome at Children’s Hospital Colorado. It was there that I learned about all the things that we had to watch for as his development progressed, and all the possibilities of what could happen as he grew. We learned that children with Down syndrome had many increased medical risks. These can include:

• low muscle tone,

• hearing loss,

• heart defects,

• vision problems,

• sleep apnea,

• spin or hip issues,

• thyroid disorders,

• digestive disorders (Celiac’s disease, Hirschsprung, constipation),

• blood disorders,

• epilepsy (infantile spasms),

• swallowing/feeding problems.

I learned that his teeth would most likely come in a different order, at different times, and some might not come in at all. I also learned that many people with Down syndrome had low immune systems and tend to pick up bugs easier, and for some a common cold can result in a hospital stay. This list would cause any parent to worry. I certainly went into worry hyper-drive when I heard all of this. Some of the things in this list I already knew, but many I did not.

As we dove into therapy, doctor appointments, urgent care stops, meetings with case managers for IFSP’s, and meeting other families in the Down syndrome world, I started to learn to never underestimate my son. I knew that he would reach all his milestones, but I quickly learned to not underestimate what he could do. Somewhere along the way, I started to look at all the things he can do and not what he can’t do. I started to see him for him and not in comparison to what the kids around him were doing. I started to see how much he is going to change the people around him for the better, and hopefully the world. He has taught me how to be an advocate. He has taught me how to assume Ability and not Disability. Most importantly, though, he’s taught me how to be a mom, and we’re so grateful we had the opportunity to say “yes.”

 

Parent Toolkit Nights: Expanding Our Toolkit

By Renee and Russell Schoenbeck; Parents of TLC toddler Riley, age 2

Riley enjoys painting contact paper with watercolors for a fun sensory activity in her toddler classroom.

Riley enjoys painting contact paper with watercolors for a fun sensory activity in her toddler classroom.

We love TLC. Let’s just throw that right out there. We love the mission. We love the philosophy. We love that we KNOW our daughter’s life is being enriched by her time spent at TLC. So, when opportunities at TLC present themselves, like Parent Toolkit Nights, we are eager to participate. 

Let us explain: Parent Toolkit Nights occur 4-6 times per academic year and are available to parents of students at TLC (prospective parents: this is a wonderful benefit). The Toolkit nights are 60 minutes and are lead by a teacher and a therapist who discuss helpful strategies that are taught in school, then offer ways to incorporate those strategies at home. 

Yes, really. The experts in early childhood education are not only willing to teach your child all day long, but they are also willing to teach YOU how to work with your kid (while providing you with snacks, laughs, and childcare). We feel like we could end this right here and invite you to join us, but let’s press on. 

Riley and her parents enjoyed the toddler costume party together last October.

Riley and her parents enjoyed the toddler costume party together last October.

Toolkit nights are spent reviewing things like visual schedules, calm down strategies, problem-solving strategies and more, in a way that bridges the gap from school to home, and helps us help our kids with life-long strategies. The strategies help us communicate with our children better, and, heck, even our significant others (because suddenly people become a lot less annoying when they say “Geeze, my engine is running so slowly!”)

The teachers and therapists put a lot of time into these nights, and not only do they have a giveaway (we won timers at the last Toolkit night!), but they always have some kind of project or handout that you can make and take home to begin introducing the strategies at home immediately. This past ToolKit night, we received starter Calm Down Kits, complete with a squishy, chew, and lavender-infused weighted pad.  Not to mention, the evening is filled with other parents who are just as grateful for the information as you are. 

At the last Toolkit night, Miss Jen talked about how the trickle-down effect works with our children within the community. If our kids can learn to self-regulate, self-soothe, communicate effectively, and make good choices, then when they interact with other kids, they model that behavior, and it spreads. How can we set our kids up to be part of this wonderful trickle-down effect? By learning. By being involved. By bridging the gap. By extending the lessons that our children are learning at school, to our home.

We are raising the future, and TLC is setting us up to succeed. I can’t tell you how many times the words “If we had access to these skills when our kids were younger…” have been uttered. We are lucky to have access to this information, and we are lucky to have teachers and therapists willing to dedicate the time to teach us.

We hope you’ll join us for the next Toolkit night on Thursday, April 26, 2018, for some snacks, laughs, and learning. 

P.S. Don’t forget, there is free childcare! 
 

How is Your "Engine" Running?

By Mia Girard, TLC Occupational Therapist & YogaKids Instructor

Hearing a story together in low lights helps our preschoolers calm their engines after fun and excitement outside.

Hearing a story together in low lights helps our preschoolers calm their engines after fun and excitement outside.

Daily life, even with its routines, can be overwhelming at times. When holidays or other new activities are added to the mix, making it through a week can feel like scaling a mountain. As a parent, there is always a lot to juggle and readjust, such as routines, sleeping habits, meals and days off school. Kids can also struggle with maintaining a consistent routine and adapting to changes, and while I know my children love excitement, they also do better with a consistent routine. As much as I love to travel, plan something fun for a weekend, and celebrate holidays with my family, the demands of juggling all the to-do’s can cause me to feel more scattered, forgetful and stressed….so my ‘engine’ tends to run fast!  What is she talking about with this ‘engine’ thing, you say? 

How Does Your Engine Run?, The Alert Program for Self-Regulation by Mary Sue Williams & Sherry Shellenberger uses the following analogy: “If your body is like a car engine, sometimes it runs on high (fast), sometimes it runs slow (low), and sometimes it runs just right.”

Interestingly, these three engine speeds normally occur throughout a given day, and no one way is right or wrong to feel. I can only go to sleep once my engine has begun to ‘slow’ before bedtime, and I do better in a high-paced yoga class when my engine runs ‘fast.’  I have learned that my engine needs to be running ‘just right’ to focus and to be the most present in the moment. The goal of this great program is to help children to learn a common language to describe their level of alertness.

When  ‘engines are running fast’ we may:
•    feel busy inside,
•    have a lot of energy,
•    want to move around and have a hard time sitting still,
•    And find it is hard to pay attention when we are running ‘fast’.

On the other hand, when  ‘engines are running slow’, we may:
•    have a hard time getting our bodies going,
•    feel sleepy inside,
•    want to rest and hold our head in our hands
•    And also have a hard time focusing or paying attention.

When  ‘engines are running just right’ we:
•    do our best talking, listening, learning and playing,
•    find it easy to focus and pay attention to what is going on around us.

In my household, to help with communication, understanding of stress levels and remaining as calm as possible, I frequently talk about my engine speed and how or why it changes. I can change it with a warm tea, a brisk walk, or accidentally setting off the smoke alarm.  I talk about exploring calming, organizing, or energizing sensory strategies using my movement, my mouth, touch, eyes, and ears.  My goal, and the goal of the program, is to expose my children to language that helps them to talk about and understand their body’s engine better. I also want children to know that while life can be stressful, we all use strategies to help with self-regulation (becoming more calm or alert). We all have our own preferred sensory strategies and use them, many times without even realizing it!
 
So, think about what makes your engine run too fast, too slow or just right, AND what changes it. Changes in routine? Jarring, loud noises? Somebody standing too close? Swinging in a hammock for hours? A warm cup of tea? Sitting for a mindful minute or two of deep breathing? And when your dog’s barking is making your engine run fast, causing you to be distracted, share that experience with your child! When you’ve taken a long quiet warm bath and your engine has slowed down before bedtime, talk about that too! This will help you to see how sensory events (e.g. your dog’s barking) and sensory strategies (e.g. mindful deep breathing) play a part in your life. It will help your child if you can talk about your engine, and share or model using your own strategies to alert or calm yourself so that they can learn this important skill from you, too!

What helps your engine run just right? 
 

Letting Wait Time Happen

By Kathy Keith, TLC Occupational Therapist

Kathy plays with a toddler during class.

Kathy plays with a toddler during class.

As an OT, I have gained much wisdom from the co-treatments I get to have with my friends, the TLC speech therapists. By working as a team with the speech therapists, I have learned more about the kiddos I work with as well as myself. In one area in particular, the growth has not only been tremendously beneficial for me but also challenging.  

Let’s start with the fact that I can be a little bit of a talker. I love to encourage, give praise, give direction (and sometimes re-direction) and can do so in a highly animated way. All great, but sometimes overwhelming for the listener. I have realized that sometimes I am so busy filling quiet spaces that I am not giving the child ample time and space to process and react to what is being said. So one thing that I have had to learn and practice is the art of WAIT TIME.  

Some kiddos can process all of the information and flurry of activity that we give them more quickly, while others need some time to take in the information, process it, and then do something with it. Innately, I know this; I talk about the importance of processing time frequently. Putting it into practice can be a little harder. The bottom line is that we all benefit from having some space and time to act.

“Go get your shoes,” or “I wonder what color that is?” or “Let me see you jump!” or “ready, set…….”  The recommended wait time before encouraging a response is around five seconds.  Five seconds? That doesn’t sound like much. However, when really giving wait time to a child (or adult), it can feel like an ETERNITY of quiet when you're waiting for a response. The response you're waiting on could be following a direction, answering a question, making a comment, or making a choice.  

One thousand one, one thousand two, one thousand three, one thousand four, one thousand five….

What I have found is that the challenge with wait time is my own challenge, and that if I do not choose to fill in the spaces with more information or by rephrasing the direction I just gave, it allows time for the response I am looking for as well as other productive and creative things to emerge. My advice, then, is to try to remember to always count to five when waiting for a response from a child you're interacting with. Sometimes, if we give them the space to think and process, they'll surprise you with the wonderful thoughts and ideas that go through their minds ...if we give them space and quiet to let those thoughts form.
 

Switching Hats: Teacher to Parent

By Amanda Brunning, TLC Preschool Teacher & Parent

TLC Infant Lead Teacher Debbie Van Thuyne with a friend

TLC Infant Lead Teacher Debbie Van Thuyne with a friend

I have been working with and teaching children with special needs and their families for the past eight years. I have been through many emotional roller coasters with parents and have been a part of many conversations where parents just needed to vent and I was happy to listen. I tried to be as much help as I could, but before becoming a parent myself, my view was limited and I couldn't say that I knew what it was like to parent a child with a disability full time.

Teachers in early childhood have kids from four to eight hours a day before they go home and we're off duty. We work with the children in a controlled setting and on a consistent schedule. We have extensive training and on-hand tools that we can draw from and utilize when a child is having a hard time. Life outside the classroom - with families, in public places - is very different and far more unpredictable than classroom life. As a teacher, I have preparation and immediate assistance for handling trying situations and behavior on top of my primary job of helping teach children educational skills and positive social behaviors,  but when a person becomes a parent, there's very little preparation for the next 18+ years of caring for and raising children of any ability. Children don't come with handbooks, and parents have to learn as they go.
 
My husband and I had been going through the adoption process for several years, and nine months ago we were matched and placed with a 7-month-old little boy with Down syndrome. I would love to say - with all of my experience and degree in early childhood and special education - that I was prepared. In truth, I did not feel prepared at all. I knew that this beautiful little boy would need pediatric therapies and that TLC would be the perfect away-from-home-home for him when I went back to work, and that the therapists would work with him both at our house and in the TLC infant nursery, and that was a huge relief when I felt overwhelmed. I was so thankful for all the help from my co-workers in getting his therapies and early interventions in place and for helping the process of transitioning our son into our home go as smoothly as possible.

After he arrived, every day was a new experience and a new visit to a new doctor. In the first few months of having our little boy we saw so many different doctors and with each doctor we felt overwhelmed at what this new doctor could say or what that visit could bring. His therapist became my go-to when I was unsure what advice to take, what direction to go, or when I was trying to figure out if something going on with him was normal for his diagnosis, or when I needed guidance on what I needed to do to help him grow and develop. His infant teacher at TLC is my other go-to when I have a parenting/infant question, and I no doubt ask her a million questions a day. Debbie (the TLC infant teacher) has also listened to me vent about everything from difficulties getting him to sleep to doctors appointments that we came away with no answers or nerves about surgery. These people have become part of our support system and we are so thankful for them. In stepping into the role of parent of a child with special needs, I'm finally getting to walk in the shoes of the parents of kiddos I've worked with throughout the years, and I feel even more connected to them and struggles that come with parenting young children.
 
Switching hats to the parent roll has opened my eyes to so much of what families with children with special needs can be going through. I hope that my new roll as this beautiful little boy's mommy can help me grow as a teacher and better support the children and families better that come into my classroom.

Through all the struggles, the late nights, spit ups, and parade of questions, I wouldn't change a thing, and I'm so grateful to my TLC support group.
 

Putting Toys Away: Tips for Fostering Language While Keeping Your House Clean(ish)

By Grace LeVasseur, TLC Speech Language Pathologist

TLC student Daphne has fun with a combination of toys and cardboard boxes at home.

TLC student Daphne has fun with a combination of toys and cardboard boxes at home.

I love picking out the perfect toy for a play session. Finding a motivating toy for a child can spark engagement to help best instruct specific speech and language skills. However, as a mom of a toddler, I know the reality of caring for these toys and the constant picking up and putting away of books, dolls, puzzles, play food, and more. Is there a way to balance exposing your child to developmentally appropriate toys/play while also keeping a clean house?

Maybe not all the time. However, given the steps below, language skills like attention, following directions, categorization, requesting, and pretend play can be fostered even during clean up. 

Step 1: Dump toys on the floor (pick a corner!) and sort. Why? Embrace the mess! What is your child drawn to out of all those toys? Which ones need to go? 

Language learning opportunity: categorization/following directions: Have your child assist you in the sorting/organizing their toys. You can do this simply and increase difficulty. 

•    "Find a book!"
•    "Grab all the books!"
•    "Put the books on the shelf"
•    "Put the books on the shelf and the animals in the basket"
•    "Put the big books on the shelf and the little books in the box"

 
 

Step 2: Put those toys in containers or reclosable bags. Why? Putting toys in their assigned groups helps a child make associations. For example, if a child pulls out "pretend foods," their experience with each fruit and vegetable reaffirms the multitude of specific "foods" within that category. 

Language learning opportunity: requesting: Is your child showing interest in the zipped up bag full of blocks? Let him/her ask to open the bag! You can do this simply and increase difficulty.

•    "I see you want to play with the blocks!"
•    "You are <insert here the action your child is taking to show you she is requesting such as reaching, pointing, nodding head, or even saying "open!">"
•    Incorporate a "script" to repeatedly use every time you open an item
o    "Knock knock, open!"
o    "zzziiiippppppp, open!"
o    "Is it stuck? Oh, you need help, 'help please! Open!'"
•    Additionally, while having a clear container creates an opportunity to label the contents inside, a colored/blocked container allows for a child to guess what's inside. 

 
 

Step 3: Put half of those containers away in another room. Why? This helps your child focus on the toys available, removes clutter (less cleaning for you), and makes for a more interesting toy after they've been out of sight for a while. 

Language learning opportunity: Attention/following directions. Is your child all done playing blocks? Using "first, then" language can help transition between activities and/or increase the time spent on the activity. 
•    "Are you all done playing blocks?"
•    (no)
•    "Oh, you still want to play with blocks! Let's stack up up up" <Voila 2 more minutes of play!>
•    "Are you all done playing blocks?"
•    (yes)
•    "Oh! First, we put the blocks in the box, then we can eat our snack!"

Step 4: Use what you've got around and outside the house. Why? This is a free and functional way to optimize vocabulary development with household items and role play of daily routines. 

Language learning opportunity: pretend play. Not using that cardboard box lying next to the recycling? Can it be transformed into a house? A kitchen?
•    Play Peek a boo! around the pretend house going in and out, flapping the doors open and shut
•    Act out daily routines: pretend to eat, sleep, wipe the floor, etc.
•    Extend these routines to include other toys: feed the doll, put the teddy bear to sleep, clean up the kitty's spilled milk, etc. 

I'll confess, I'm actually not a neat freak. To be honest, my living room is usually messy... However, considering from time to time that cleaning can also be an opportunity for play and interaction, making "putting toys away" that much more fun and meaningful for you and your child. 

Hear What Parents are Saying About TLC!

TLC celebrates all of our families! Recently we welcomed new Speech Therapist Grace to our staff, and her daughter Daphne to our infant room

TLC celebrates all of our families! Recently we welcomed new Speech Therapist Grace to our staff, and her daughter Daphne to our infant room

We love when our parents and families share their thoughts about how TLC has impacted their children. Below are a few comments we've received from current parents, and we are so thrilled to be such a positive experience in their family's lives! You can read what other families have to say on our Testimonials page.

Isabel Cardoza, TLC preschool parents

I am really happy with TLC. I've noticed my son's improvements while coming to school - he wakes up energetic and happy to attend school. He also loves his teacher Ms. Caitlin. Everyone is so nice and kind and very supportive.

Robin Newman, TLC preschool parent

We are very happy with TLC. My son enjoys coming to school each day. We have a great support system here and I am thankful for each and every person - Caitlin, Lupe, Lindsey, Cindy, Breck, Cynthia and Kelly. TLC is a fantastic preschool! Thank you for all that you're doing for my son.

Marley & Jason Woods, TLC toddler parents

We love TLC. Our son just turned two and can already count to 20 and knows his alphabet. The teachers at TLC are amazing. My son is excited to go to school everyday!

TLC parent to a preschool four year old

I am very happy with TLC! My daughter has always loved school, but had a bad experience at a different school. I switched her to TLC and within a couple of weeks she was back to loving school again! TLC is so loving, patient, and genuine. So grateful to TLC!

Encouraging Self-Directed Learning in Kids

by Amanda Boldenow, TLC Development Manager & Parent

Cultivating curiosity and independence in children are the first steps to helping children become self-directed learners. Self-directed learners know how to use resources to find answers to questions or to learn skills to solve problems. Self-directed learners do not need micro-managing from an adult to help them complete tasks or projects, (but it's important to recognize the difference between asking for assistance from an adult to complete a task and relying on an adult  to make sure the task is completed).

Self-directed learning is not a trait that some children are born with and others aren't; it is a skill that can be taught and nurtured in all children from a young age. So how can you help a child become a self-directed learner? Below are a few steps you can take to help a child gain independence and drive: 

Have Patience and Remember Kids are Capable

When a child is struggling to complete a task, whether the task is tying their shoes or a math problem, it can be tempting to step in and complete it for them, thinking we are "helping" by showing them how the task is done properly. To help kids discover their own capabilities, have patience as they struggle through something new and difficult. Let them make a wrong turn in pursuit of figuring out a problem, and be there to encourage and advise as they wrestle with the difficulty. Ask questions, such as: "What do you think would happen if we tried it another way?" "Where could you look to find help figuring this out?" "Where could you go to learn more about that?"

Encourage Effort Over Success

Studies have shown that children who are praised for their effort at completing a task, rather than completing the task itself, are more likely to put effort into future difficult situations. Praising success in children can teach children that success, rather than the process of learning something new, is what is valued, and thereby make them afraid of failing at future endeavors. Children who are afraid of failing are less likely to try something new, whereas children who are praised for effort are encouraged to continue putting forth effort into new and increasingly difficult challenges.

Connect Play Time to Learning Experiences

Nurture a child's interest by connecting what they enjoy to the wider world. If a child likes building, help them expand on their interest by introducing engineering and architectural concepts. If a child likes sculpting with clay, help them explore structures that animals sculpt in nature, like swallow's nests or bee hives. 

Allow for Free Play

It's also important to remember that children inherently learn while playing, so allow time for uninterrupted, unstructured play, where children can fully use and explore their imaginations and creativity.

Create Opportunities for Exploration

Creating opportunities for children to learn can be as easy as leaving paper and colored pencils in easy reach for children to use when inspiration strikes. It can entail making sure that utensils for making a bowl of cereal are in easy reach so children can learn to take care of themselves, and take pride in their independent skill. 

Nurturing self-directed learning is a combination of allowing for free and loosely-guided play and activities. Children thrive in routines, but making sure that their routines include open-ended exploration fueled by their own curiosity can help lead to independent kids with a life-long love of learning.

TLC Parent Testimonials: We Love Our Families!

By Amy French-Troy, TLC Parent and Volunteer

I am an educator and my school has referred several students to TLC for evaluations and therapy over the years. While I was aware that TLC had a preschool for special needs children, it wasn’t until we were searching for a new school for our son, that I discovered that TLC is also an inclusive preschool that purposefully mixes children of all types of backgrounds and abilities in an effort to raise more empathetic, compassionate, and conscientious kids. After a tour of the school and reading about the school’s mission and curricula, we knew that TLC was the right place for both of our children (at the time, TLC had just added the infant/toddler program and we were thrilled to enroll our baby daughter, as well). 

In the last year, TLC has far exceeded my expectations as both a parent and an educator. The manner in which faculty and staff blend academics and social emotional skills should be a model for more schools. Since beginning kindergarten, several teachers have commented on my son’s ability to mediate tricky situations between peers and I know that this in great part due to his time at TLC. I have also been impressed with the amount of differentiation that teachers afford students, and their ability meet each child where they are and design a learning plan that will help each student to reach their full potential. I would recommend TLC to any parent who is looking for a school that fosters diversity, compassion, and lifelong learning. It feels so good to be able to leave my children in the care of such caring professionals whose aim it is to not only teach kids academics, but the life skills needed to be kind and caring members of society. 

Inspirational "Potty Talk"

By Christie Griffith, TLC Occupational Therapist

If you come to the TLC Learning Center and happen to use the adult bathrooms during your visit, you might notice that we often have things posted on the backs of the stall doors and/or walls.  A little “potty talk” for your reading enjoyment while you are a captive audience sitting on the throne.   They might be inspirational, humorous, thought provoking, instructional, etc. but most importantly, they change on a weekly or monthly basis to keep your interest and to keep teaching new things.

One item that often makes an appearance here is a copy of the current handout for parents called Skills Sheets by Sandbox Learning (also available at www.sandbox-learning.com) that is a part of our Pyramid Plus Positive Behavior Development program at TLC.  It offers practical suggestions to parents for a variety of topics such as Holiday Social Skill Strategies, Having Guests and Visiting Others, or Teaching Skills for Playing with Others.  Another parent handout that may appear on the walls is from the Backpack Connection Series (from www.challengingbehavior.org) and may include topics such as How to Teach Your Child to Take Turns, How to Help Your Child to Stop Whining, and How to Have Your Child Have a Successful Bedtime.

But “potty talk” is not just for parents.  Sometimes the topics are relevant for staff and other adults who visit.  Brief articles torn from magazines or printed off the internet may offer suggestions for identifying your personality type, ideas for how to slow down and take time to enjoy your life, healthy food choices, or humorous stories to inspire, educate and entertain you for those brief moments of private time in the stall.

“Potty Talk” can also be adapted for children and teens.  Funny pictures or cartoons, schedule reminders of upcoming events, inspirational sayings, or very short stories can be posted for their entertainment.  They may even learn some new things without even realizing it! 

So, I encourage you to incorporate a little “potty talk” into your own life.  It can be useful at work or at home.  If you don’t want to keep putting tape on and pulling it off of your wall consider some alternative ways of posting- hang a small chalk board or cork board on the door or wall nearby, tape or pin up a plastic clear sheet protector for papers that you can slide things into and out of, or use reusable mounting putty to stick things up temporarily. Turns for posting can be rotated through family members or employees to lessen the burden on just one person, if desired.  Ideas for what to post can be found in magazines, newspaper articles, comics, online searches, etc.  Or come on in to the TLC Learning Center and visit our bathrooms for a little inspiration!

And while we’re talking about potties, remember that children do not have to be potty trained to begin preschool at TLC. Teachers work with kids to help them become “potty talk” ready, so they can join in the extra for minutes of learning and inspiration, too!


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